FANDOM


Minimum System Requirements Edit

  • O/S: Windows XP SP2/Vista
  • Processor: 1.8 GHz Single-Core Processor
  • RAM: 512 MB RAM (1 GB for Windows Vista)
  • Video Card: 128 MB DirectX 9 3D Video Card (Radeon 9600 / GeForce FX 6600 and above)
  • Direct X: DirectX 9.0c
  • Sound Card: Compatible Sound Card
  • Other Hardware: DVD-ROM Drive, Keyboard and Mouse, Speakers
  • Space Requirment: 3 GB Hard Drive Space

Recommended System Requirements Edit

  • O/S: Windows XP SP2/Vista
  • Processor: 2.2 GHz Dual- or Quad-Core Processor
  • RAM: 1GB RAM (2GB for Windows Vista)
  • Video Card: 256 MB DirectX 9 3D Video Card (Radeon X1600 / GeForce 7600 and above)
  • Direct X: DirectX 9.0c
  • Sound Card: Compatible Sound Card
  • Other Hardware: DVD-ROM Drive, Keyboard and Mouse, Speakers
  • Space Requirment: 3 GB Hard Drive Space

Can I Run This Game ? Edit

Sins of a Solar Empire can run reasonably well on computers below the minimum requirements; for example, a laptop with a 1.4 GHz Celeron CPU and an ATi Radeon eXpress x200m video card can run the game with all settings on lowest at 1280 x 800 screen resolution with playable frame-rates throughout most games.

If you are unsure of your systems specs, you can use this tool to help you check if your computer can run Sins of a Solar Empire.

Do note, however, that if you turn up graphics detail to the higher settings and allow a game to get large (large fleets, multiple enemies, etc.), then in combat, particularly if you zoom in (e.g. have the camera follow a fighter or a frigate in a planar view), game performance will tank massively, more or less without regard to your hardware. In such conditions, less than 10 FPS is not uncommon even on hardware well in excess of the recommended specs.

This may be a limitation of the game engine, or may be due to the massive number of VFX the game computes and displays in a large battle on high zoom (most ships have more than one weapon emplacement per bank, they all fire individually, there are hundreds of individual fighters, shield impacts, hull impacts, ability effects, etc.).

Zooming out of combat usually helps enough to restore playability (ideally a top-down view where most ships are not individually drawn, or a galaxy view where the gravity well is not drawn at all, if you don't need to micromanage). If you get such slowdowns too often, with small fleets as well as large, or even when zoomed out, it may be better to reduce your graphics settings and / or play smaller maps (fewer opponents) or smaller fleets (via fleet size options setting).